Check Point Research Finds 40% Rise In Cybercrime, with Little Evidence of Slowing Down

Check Point Research Finds 40% Rise In Cybercrime, with Little Evidence of Slowing Down

By Luke Bellos

Business and organizations across the globe have been on high alert over the last two years due to the dramatic rise in cybercrime. It seems as if every day a new report is released about hacks or ransomware, with many executive leaders questioning if their operations could be the next victim. The consistency and devastation of these attacks has many people wondering if anything can seriously be done to protect the digital world from these ongoing threats.

Check Point Research, a division of Check Point® Software Technologies Ltd., confirmed the rise in cybercriminal activity with a new report focused on attacks that took place over the last year. The report arrives just in time for Cybersecurity Awareness Month, which could act as a wakeup call for leaders that are unaware of the severity of these exploits.

According to the results of the report, September 2021 marked the highest levels of weekly cybercrime attacks with an average of 870 (double the amount from March 2020). Research also pointed out which sectors have been hit the hardest, with Education and Research leading(1,468 attacks per organization each week), followed by Government/Military(1,082 ) and Healthcare(752). Interestingly, Check Point found that African organizations experienced the highest levels of cybercriminal activity in 2021, and has been recognized as the most targeted region in the world for these attacks.

“Since the outbreak of the pandemic globally, cyber criminals have sprung into action to take advantage of the opportunities presented to them.” commented Omer Dembinsky, Data Research Group Manager, Threat Intelligence and Research Organization, Check Point Software Technologies. “With the continued rise in cyberattacks, Check Point Software recommends that organizations adopt a preventive approach to cybersecurity, rather than work on remediation after the fact when damage has been inflicted.”

This report could be a critical resource for organizations that truly want to understand the consequences of falling victim to a major cyber attack. While AI, automation, and sophisticated algorithms can be extremely helpful for preventing these attacks, human understanding may be the best defense for avoiding trouble. If organizational leaders and employees have a deep understanding of how and why these attacks occur, cybercrime can be mitigated with common sense and little technical intervention.

Learn more about how managed service providers are helping businesses protect themselves from online attackers by joining MSP EXPO from Feb 8-11, 2022 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida , where visitors can gain insights from leading experts within the MSP space.




Edited by Maurice Nagle
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